A cheap version of Yasko’s protocol

I got a comment from Lloyd recently:

Bravo, I follow a real cheap version of Yasko’s protocol ,”invented” by Fred Davis and Richard von Kennenberg on Phoenixrising.me. I had CFS/fibromyagia f0r over thirty ears. Supposedly  cfs/fm is on adult onset version of autism. I love the theory. Cured a huge chunck of most if not all of my symptoms. May I suggest looking at Freetheanimal.com, resistant starch + soil based probiotics. This proved as valuable as methylation upstart for me.  Peace.

Considering NAET for autism treatment?

naetA parent contacted me with questions, asking more information about our NAET (Nambudripad Allergy Elimination Treatment) experience in autism treatment.  I should say that my daughter has made amazing progress in her ability to relate to others and understand what they may be feeling or thinking. My son, too, is making great strides. She is now 26; he is 21.

1. “My child doesn’t have allergies. I read that NAET helps allergy-related autism. Would it be a waste for me?”

My kids didn’t appear to be allergic to anything much to start with. My daughter did have a problem with cats. So, for them this was not an allergy treatment. It was a treatment that normalized the way their bodies respond to environmental challenges.

NAET defines allergies differently from the rest of the world; it’s sensitivity to substances that you probably didn’t know were bothering you.  So “allergy-related autism” in NAET parlance
must mean most autism cases. Don’t ask me what non-allergy-related autism would be. Caused by an injury perhaps?

Personally I am a somewhat allergic individual. My kids not as much. They can stand cats, for instance, and have no food allergies. Yet NAET helped them a whole lot. It took a while, and it took effort– NAET involves avoiding things for 25 hours, and so it’s not for the faint of heart. It also took money, in our case $55 per week for most of a year at least. (Actually they both continued for more than two years, but benefits were apparent after one year.)  Insurance did not cover it for us, probably not for you either.

There’s also the study showing most autistic kids benefited in some way from a year of NAET,
I expect you have run across that?

I evaluated the situation and concluded that NAET couldn’t hurt them, and it might help. I am SO GLAD I did. Of course it cost money, and that took some of our savings (a cashed-in life insurance policy). In your case perhaps you have savings or a doting grandparent who is willing to donate some money. Is there something you can give up? We don’t have cable TV and have dumb phones. Etc. Etc.  Bottom line, if you don’t do it, you may regret it, and there’ s  no going back to that developmental point.

2. “Your kids are doing it for over two years… they are allergic to that many things? Is Naet done infinitely?”

I can give you my theories on what is happening, but the NAET people don’t necessarily agree with me.  They don’t have a way to explain it that makes sense either. NAET is not done indefinitely.

I think NAET is manipulating our bodies’ bioelectric field in such a way as to make our bodies respond differently to toxins and other things in the environment that we may encounter.  This is the long term effect. I think autism is caused by a buildup of toxins from the environment in the body, which the individual is not able to get rid of (as the result of a genetic predisposition probably). So the autism is improved because the body gradually learns to let go of its stored toxins. My opinion only.

The short term treatment looks like the practitioner is “treating” you for something you’re not allergic to, like tap water, or something you commonly eat with no problem, like red meat.  The treatment is designed to allow your body to accept the substance.  It really doesn’t seem to make sense, since my kids were never allergic to tap water or red meat or about 99.9 percent of the things they were treated for. I conclude that the word “allergy” in NAET means something different than what it means to most of us.

No doubt in NAET treatment you will go for a while wondering if there will be any changes. For my daughter it took one year to see any benefit (and then it was a whopper). For my son it was a bit longer.  But for the kids in the study, marked and measurable improvements were found after one year. So you have to hang in there and be patient.

Parent of autistic child reports progress with NAET

naetA blogger who calls herself “Muckraking Maven” has taken the plunge and started NAET treatments for her autistic son. Her husband thought she was crazy. But she evaluated the study showing that NAET has helped autistics, talked to parents of autistics who had been helped by NAET, and embarked.

Of course you know I also embarked on NAET for my two Aspies. My 25-year-old daughter “Shannon” has recovered from her Asperger’s, and is making her way into normal life. My 20-year-old son “Mike” is doing well in many, many ways. These changes occurred after at least a year of NAET treatments.

Muckraking Maven also has some great news to report. Check out her post, complete with videos.

http://muckrakingmaven.wordpress.com/2013/07/08/have-you-heard-of-naet-for-allergies-autism-chronic-illnesses-this-is-worth-reading/

Amish have next-to-no autism. Why is that?

hypodermicThe curious case of the Amish has been batted around online lately.

Doctors caring for Amish communities report only a tiny incidence of autism, according to Dan Olmsted, an investigative reporter writing for “The Age of Autism.” (No one is willing to actually fund a study of this phenomenon, so there aren’t any hard numbers.)

So the question for me becomes: why the lower incidence? Is it the raw milk? The homegrown food? Or less-than-normal rates of compliance with the aggressive U.S. vaccine schedule? Or all of the above?

I think the vaccine question requires more examination, especially since another study reports less autism in a population that is under-vaccinated (and thus has less exposure to aluminum, a toxin).

A government of, by, and for the people should not be blocking these questions, but funding investigation of them. Do we have a government of, by, and for the special interests, namely those who stand to lose huge profits if the more-and-more-required-vaccines steamroller is derailed?

Source: http://www.ageofautism.com/2012/05/dan-olmsted-the-amish-all-over-again.html

Mike going off to college

PW_tree1Our son “Mike,” who has been doing NAET treatments for more than two years now, is doing much better in every way and plans to leave home to go to college in the fall.  (He’s 20, transferring from the local community college.)  He’s also been taking supplements from the Yasko protocol, but in the past couple of months decided not to take them for his own reasons (checking to see if he really needs them?). He has decided he’s better off taking them, and is starting up again.  He’s on a much-abbreviated list of them, as determined by our chiropractor who muscle-tests each one to see whether his body responds positively or negatively to it.

When we started on this journey, at the beginning of this blog in 2007, I wondered whether he would always have to take the Yasko supplements, since they seemed to remediate a genetic deficiency in the way his body works. Or would taking them somehow improve the biochemistry in his body over time?  The answer seems to be clear: his biochemistry has improved. He can get along without the supplements now, but he’s better off taking a few of them. The most important one for him is phosphatidyl serine, by the way. Without that one, he can get irritable. Note that his genetic burden differs from other people’s, so you can’t assume what works for him will work for you.

NAET is a treatment that uses Chinese medicine theory (meridians, energy flow).  How it works I wonder; I think it has to do with bioelectricity. I can see that it does do some amazing things. Don’t pooh-pooh it just because you don’t understand it!

Correlation between autism rates and amounts of aluminum from vaccines

A year ago I reported on a Canadian study from the University of British Columbia that found strong correlation between autism rates and vaccination with vaccines containing aluminum, which is most childhood vaccines. I predicted that vaccine advocates would ignore it.

That certainly seems to have been the case, as articles continue to be written smearing vaccine questioners.  But I was glad to see a recent Internet article by Chris D. Meletis, N.D., a naturopathic doctor, continuing to question aluminum in vaccines. In The Whole Health Insider this month, she (he?) continued the argument about toxins like aluminum contributing to or causing autism, and added another twist: they seem to cause Alzheimer’s, too.

So, how do adults get aluminum exposure?

Daily, we’re exposed to aluminum from additives in commercially prepared foods, drinking water, sunscreens and deodorants. Like those for children, vaccines for adults can also expose us to aluminum. The amount of aluminum in vaccines can vary depending on the storage container. Storing vaccines in glass containers can up the aluminum content by 200 times compared to storing vaccines in plastic containers. (Aluminum leeches from the glass into the solution during autoclaving or storage.)

Small amounts of aluminum are absorbed into the circulation, crossing into the blood-brain barrier and accumulating in neurons of the brain regions vulnerable to Alzheimer’s damage. In this way, with advancing age, aluminum builds up in the brain and in the neurons.

Sources:

http://www.wholehealthinsider.com/newsletter/2013/february-2013/alzheimers-and-autism-the-common-link/

http://phylliswheeler.com/CuringAutismBlog/?p=590

Mindfulness, a new concept for us

PW_tree2“Mike,” my son with Asperger’s, has come a long way, first from his supplements from the Yasko protocol (which allowed him an emotional even keel) and now from two years of NAET treatments, which seem to be helping him control his anxiety.  But he still has Asperger’s, and as part of that he still has ADD.

He’s 20 years old, and I would love it if he learned to drive. I spend too much time driving him where he needs to go. We live in the suburbs where the bus service to anywhere but the community college is terrible.  He’s been working on learning to drive for a couple of years at least. If my autistic 55-year-old brother learned to drive as a teenager, why can’t “Mike”?

He’s not getting there. What’s holding him back? The ADD. He’s not really focusing on what he is doing, while driving or doing most other things. He’s paying attention to some other script going on in his head, I think. We nearly had a serious accident in November because of this inattention, and since then I’ve been rethinking this. Maybe he isn’t a candidate for driving.

Then I read an article that was encouraging seniors to practice “mindfulness” as a way of preventing mental lapses.  Mindfulness is consciously paying attention to what’s around you. For example, you could take a walk in your neighborhood and notice what’s different from yesterday–a new for-sale sign up in the neighbor’s yard, a kite stuck in a tree, the neighbor’s car with a dented fender, or whatever.  This sounds pretty normal to the way I operate. But I realized it’s not normal for “Mike.” The idea is to practice it consciously.

I want him to practice this for a while before we try driving again.

Why does autism seem to coincide with mitochondrial problems?

cropped-PW_leaf1.jpgThere’s a lot of discussion among researchers these days about why so many people with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) have mitochondrial issues.

What are mitochondria? They are energy-producing organs inside each cell of our body. They take inputs from the blood stream and from previous mitochondrial processes and create outputs that keep the body going in a number of ways. Most importantly, the Yasko protocol that has so helped my Asperger’s son addresses malfunctions in these mitochondrial processes using a variety of supplements.

Anyway, Dr. Amy Yasko, the researcher whose protocol many autistics have benefited from, has authored a paper with an MD, Nancy Mullan, looking at why these mitochondrial processes are disrupted in so many people with ASD, those with genetic markers for this, and those without.

In brief, what could be causing the autism epidemic? Take a look.

http://www.scribd.com/doc/118974801/Aluminum-Toxicity-in-Mitochondrial-Dysfunction-and-ASD

A simpler Yasko protocol: eat veggies?

The Yasko protocol for treating people with autism isn’t easy to do. What if there were a way to simply eat the right foods and do the same job?

With the Yasko protocol, you have to get a whole long list of supplements, many of them obscure, and then you have to somehow figure out which ones are helpful.  The whole point is to provide support for processes that go on in the mitochondria, or energy factories, in every cell of the body. Something has caused those processes to go awry, probably exposure to too many toxins, more than the individual’s body can get rid of naturally. (We live in a sea of toxins. If you think the government is protecting us from chemicals, you are wrong.)

There’s an MD who’s successfully treating not autism but multiple sclerosis in herself by eating the right foods. So, how is that relevant? Here’s how: through her diet she is supporting the mitochondrial processes, same thing Yasko’s protocol does.

I don’t know if you’ve noticed, but alongside the autism epidemic there seems to be a marked increase in a variety of other conditions: allergies, athsma, multiple sclerosis, Parkinsons, ALS, and so on. It’s very evident to someone who has lived 60 years, as I have. The world used to be different. What if supporting the mitochondrial processes though food or supplements worked to help people fight all these diseases of the immune system and neurological system?

So, what does that have to do with you, my readers? Well, if you are wishing the Yasko protocol was easier and cheaper to implement, you could try the diet of Terry Wahls, MD.  Through simply eating a prescribed set of mostly organic vegetables, she has delivered herself from crippling multiple sclerosis. Now she can walk, run, and ride a bicycle. Before, she couldn’t even sit up in her wheelchair. She’s eating at least three cups of certain organic fruits and vegetables at each meal, plus selected protein sources. Grains are minimized or eliminated. It’s a variation of the “paleo diet,” eaten by healthy hunter gatherers.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/meryl-davids-landau/multiple-sclerosis-diet_b_2258056.html