Tag Archives: ADD

Mike going off to college

PW_tree1Our son “Mike,” who has been doing NAET treatments for more than two years now, is doing much better in every way and plans to leave home to go to college in the fall.  (He’s 20, transferring from the local community college.)  He’s also been taking supplements from the Yasko protocol, but in the past couple of months decided not to take them for his own reasons (checking to see if he really needs them?). He has decided he’s better off taking them, and is starting up again.  He’s on a much-abbreviated list of them, as determined by our chiropractor who muscle-tests each one to see whether his body responds positively or negatively to it.

When we started on this journey, at the beginning of this blog in 2007, I wondered whether he would always have to take the Yasko supplements, since they seemed to remediate a genetic deficiency in the way his body works. Or would taking them somehow improve the biochemistry in his body over time?  The answer seems to be clear: his biochemistry has improved. He can get along without the supplements now, but he’s better off taking a few of them. The most important one for him is phosphatidyl serine, by the way. Without that one, he can get irritable. Note that his genetic burden differs from other people’s, so you can’t assume what works for him will work for you.

NAET is a treatment that uses Chinese medicine theory (meridians, energy flow).  How it works I wonder; I think it has to do with bioelectricity. I can see that it does do some amazing things. Don’t pooh-pooh it just because you don’t understand it!

Mindfulness, a new concept for us

PW_tree2“Mike,” my son with Asperger’s, has come a long way, first from his supplements from the Yasko protocol (which allowed him an emotional even keel) and now from two years of NAET treatments, which seem to be helping him control his anxiety.  But he still has Asperger’s, and as part of that he still has ADD.

He’s 20 years old, and I would love it if he learned to drive. I spend too much time driving him where he needs to go. We live in the suburbs where the bus service to anywhere but the community college is terrible.  He’s been working on learning to drive for a couple of years at least. If my autistic 55-year-old brother learned to drive as a teenager, why can’t “Mike”?

He’s not getting there. What’s holding him back? The ADD. He’s not really focusing on what he is doing, while driving or doing most other things. He’s paying attention to some other script going on in his head, I think. We nearly had a serious accident in November because of this inattention, and since then I’ve been rethinking this. Maybe he isn’t a candidate for driving.

Then I read an article that was encouraging seniors to practice “mindfulness” as a way of preventing mental lapses.  Mindfulness is consciously paying attention to what’s around you. For example, you could take a walk in your neighborhood and notice what’s different from yesterday–a new for-sale sign up in the neighbor’s yard, a kite stuck in a tree, the neighbor’s car with a dented fender, or whatever.  This sounds pretty normal to the way I operate. But I realized it’s not normal for “Mike.” The idea is to practice it consciously.

I want him to practice this for a while before we try driving again.